Original Research - Special Collection: Religion and Theology and Constructions of Earth and Gender

Realist literature, gender and gullibility in African Pentecostalism: The case of Chiundura Moyo’s Kereke Inofa

Enna S. Gudhlanga, Angeline M. Madongonda, Molly Manyonganise
HTS Teologiese Studies / Theological Studies | Vol 79, No 3 | a8258 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/hts.v79i3.8258 | © 2023 Enna S. Gudhlanga, Angeline M. Madongonda, Molly Manyonganise | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 31 October 2022 | Published: 23 March 2023

About the author(s)

Enna S. Gudhlanga, Department of Languages and Literature, Faculty of Arts, Culture and Heritage Studies, Zimbabwe Open University, Harare, Zimbabwe; and Department of New Testament, Faculty of Catholic Theology, University of Bamberg, Bamberg, Germany; and Department of African Languages, Faculty of Human Sciences, University of South Africa, Pretoria, South Africa
Angeline M. Madongonda, Department of Languages and Literature, Faculty of Arts, Culture and Heritage Studies, Zimbabwe Open University, Harare, Zimbabwe
Molly Manyonganise, Department of Religious Studies and Philosophy, Faculty of Arts, Culture and Heritage Studies, Zimbabwe Open University, Harare, Zimbabwe; and, Department of New Testament, Faculty of Catholic Theology, University of Bamberg, Bamberg, Germany; and, Department of Religion Studies, Faculty of Theology and Religion, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa

Abstract

There is a general consensus among religious scholars that Pentecostalism has risen phenomenally in Africa and Zimbabwe is no exception. In most cases, Pentecostalism has been presented as a sophisticated brand of Christianity while members of African Independent churches are shown to be gullible. The newly founded Pentecostal churches are more focused on gospreneurship while the media is busy with cases of cheating, dishonesty and the sexual abuse of women in these churches. Thus, academic scholars have begun to pay their attention on gullibility in Pentecostalism. Unfortunately, not many scholarly works have looked at literary texts that bring out the gullibility of members of Pentecostal churches in Zimbabwe. This article seeks to bridge this gap by analysing Aaron Chiundura Moyo’s Kereke Inofa [The Church Can die]. The main purpose is to bring out the significance of literary texts in projecting societal ills, specifically the gender power dynamics in Zimbabwean Pentecostal churches that may be difficult to deal with directly. The focus is on how women and some men are victims of the whims of some Pentecostal church leaders. The article is informed by the socio-historical approach, which states that artists derive the material for their works of art, subject matter, images and artistic languages from the life experiences of their societies. The socio-historical approach enables the researcher to understand the prevalence of gullibility in Pentecostal churches in Zimbabwe. The article relies heavily on content analysis of Moyo’s Kereke Inofa’s presentation of deception, and infidelity in Pentecostal Churches being performed on members who are projected in this play as ‘gullible’.

Contribution: This article’s contribution lies in its critical analysis of gender and gullibility in African Pentecostalism in Zimbabwe. It is significant as it utilises a literary text to project the ills in Pentecostal churches and women’s sexual vulnerabilities.


Keywords

cheating; church; dishonesty; gospreneurship; gullibility; Kereke Inofa; Pentecostalism; sexual abuse; Zimbabwe.

Sustainable Development Goal

Goal 5: Gender equality

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Crossref Citations

1. Weeding Syncretism from Pentecostal Wheat in Zimbabwe
Kimion Tagwirei
Pharos Journal of Theology  issue: 105(1)  year: 2023  
doi: 10.46222/pharosjot.10532