Original Research

Understanding theodicy and anthropodicy in the perspective of Job and its implications for human suffering

Muner Daliman, Hana Suparti, Fajar Gumelar, Ezra Tari, Hengki Wijaya
HTS Teologiese Studies / Theological Studies | Vol 78, No 1 | a7679 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/hts.v78i1.7679 | © 2022 Muner Daliman, Hana Suparti, Fajar Gumelar, Ezra Tari, Hengki Wijaya | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 25 April 2022 | Published: 17 August 2022

About the author(s)

Muner Daliman, Department of Theology, Sekolah Tinggi Teologi Kadesi Yogyakarta, D.I. Yogyakarta, Indonesia
Hana Suparti, Department of Christian Education, Sekolah Tinggi Teologi Kadesi Yogyakarta, D.I. Yogyakarta, Indonesia
Fajar Gumelar, Department of Theology, Sekolah Tinggi Filsafat Jaffray Makassar, Makassar, Indonesia
Ezra Tari, Department of Christian Education, Institut Agama Kristen Negeri Kupang, Kupang, Indonesia
Hengki Wijaya, Department of Christian Education, Sekolah Tinggi Filsafat Jaffray Makassar, Makassar, Indonesia


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Abstract

Suffering is often experienced by those who obey God, while happiness is experienced by those who do not know God. This study aims to re-examine theodicy about disasters and calamities and tries to provide alternative thoughts regarding the relationship between God, accidents and humans, based on the story of Job. This research methodology is a qualitative approach through library research, by reading books and journals and investigating related books. Hermeneutic principles are also used to understand the meaning of the signs and symbols in the text. The results of this study indicate that the concept of anthropodicy stands as a complement to the idea of theodicy, which can help humans - especially believers - to understand the meaning of suffering and their vocation in a world full of uncertainty while still having faith in God, who is sovereign over all.

Contribution: This article contributes to providing an understanding of anthropodicy from Job’s perspective, so that humans see suffering as God’s sovereignty and as something that God allows in order to see God’s omnipotence.


Keywords

anthropodicy; Job; suffering; omnipotence; obedient

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