Original Research - Special Collection: Septuagint

Alternative revisions of the American Standard Version (1901) and retranslations within the Tyndale–King James Version tradition

Jacobus A. Naudé, Cynthia L. Miller-Naudé
HTS Teologiese Studies / Theological Studies | Vol 78, No 1 | a7650 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/hts.v78i1.7650 | © 2022 Jacobus A. Naudé, Cynthia L. Miller-Naudé | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 14 April 2022 | Published: 13 September 2022

About the author(s)

Jacobus A. Naudé, Department of Hebrew, Faculty of the Humanities, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa
Cynthia L. Miller-Naudé, Department of Hebrew, Faculty of the Humanities, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa


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Abstract

In this essay, we demonstrate that in addition to the Revised Standard Version and its revisions as part of the linear emergence of the Tyndale–King James Version tradition in the 20th and 21st centuries, there are also alternative revisions and retranslations of the King James Version (KJV) of 1611 as literal or word-for-word translations, which emerge as divergent branches. The revisions of the American Standard Version (ASV) (1901) emerged in the following branches, namely the New American Standard Bible (NASB) and its revisions, The Amplified Bible (AB) and its revisions, as well as The Living Bible, Paraphrased and its retranslation, the New Living Translation (NLT). Then there are revisions that emerged as alternatives to the Revised Standard Version (1946–1952/1971) by reverting to the King James Revised (Blayney) Edition (1769) as their incipient text rather than the ASV, namely The Modern King James Version (MKJV) (and similar revisions), The New King James Version (NKJV) and the New Cambridge Paragraph Bible. Finally, there are retranslations within the Tyndale–King James Version tradition, namely the Contemporary English Version (CEV), and the Common English Bible (CEB). The diversity reflects the search for individual identity to satisfy particular reader expectations in an age of digital-media interpretive culture featuring broad universal values.

Contribution: Instead of viewing the revisions and retranslations within the Tyndale–King James Version tradition since the second half of the 20th century as new and independent, it is demonstrated that the various branches and their versions rather continue the emergence of the pre-20th century translation complex within this tradition to satisfy particular reader expectations.


Keywords

King James Version; American Standard Version; Contemporary English Version; Common English Bible; Living Bible; New Living Translation; New American Standard Bible

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