Original Research - Special Collection: Septuagint

The Revised Standard Version (1952) and its revisions as a linear emergence of the Tyndale–King James Version tradition

Cynthia L. Miller-Naudé, Jacobus A. Naudé
HTS Teologiese Studies / Theological Studies | Vol 78, No 1 | a7647 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/hts.v78i1.7647 | © 2022 Cynthia L. Miller-Naudé, Jacobus A. Naudé | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 14 April 2022 | Published: 08 September 2022

About the author(s)

Cynthia L. Miller-Naudé, Department of Hebrew, Faculty of Humanities, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa
Jacobus A. Naudé, Department of Hebrew, Faculty of Humanities, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa


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Abstract

Revisions of the King James Version of 1611 continued into the 20th and 21st centuries as literal or word-for-word translations. This development corresponds with a new age in Bible translation that started in the second half of the 20th century, which involves at least six changes in the philosophy of Bible translation. Firstly, Bible translation is characterised by interconfessional cooperation. Secondly, the plain meaning intended in the incipient texts is made accessible to readers. Thirdly, new critical editions of the Hebrew and Greek incipient texts on the basis of new discoveries of texts are utilised. Fourthly, there is the tendency to remove archaic language to make versions intelligible. Fifthly, there is a tendency to use gendered and inclusive language. Sixthly, the move is from print communication, which can be typified as typographic interpretive culture, to electronic or media communication, which can be typified as digital-media interpretive culture, where sound and visuality become prominent as a contextual supplement to words. In the analysis it will be determined which of these aspects are reflected in the Revised Standard Version and its revisions as part of the linear emergence of the Tyndale–King James Version tradition. However, unlike the King James Version, the Revised Standard Version and its revisions failed to achieve widespread approval from satisfied readers, thus opening the door to alternative revisions.

Contribution: Instead of viewing the Revised Standard Version and its revisions as new and independent from the Tyndale–King James Version tradition, it is demonstrated that they are a linear continuation of the emergence of the pre-20th century translation complex within this tradition without replicating the success of the King James Version.


Keywords

King James Version; American Standard Version; Revised Standard Version; The Reader’s Digest Bible; New Revised Standard Version; English Standard Version; New Revised Standard Version Updated Edition; digital media interpretive culture

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Crossref Citations

1. Emergence of the Tyndale–King James Version tradition in English Bible translation
Jacobus A. Naudé
HTS Teologiese Studies / Theological Studies  vol: 78  issue: 1  year: 2022  
doi: 10.4102/hts.v78i1.7649