Original Research - Special Collection: Gender Justice and Health and Human Development

Addressing women’s construction health and safety needs in Africa

Samuel H. P. Chikafalimani, Nathan Kibwami, Sibusiso Moyo
HTS Teologiese Studies / Theological Studies | Vol 77, No 2 | a6849 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/hts.v77i2.6849 | © 2021 Samuel H.P. Chikafalimani, Nathan Kibwami, Sibusiso Moyo | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 18 May 2021 | Published: 21 October 2021

About the author(s)

Samuel H. P. Chikafalimani, Department of Construction Management and Quantity Surveying, Faculty of Engineering and the Built Environment, Durban University of Technology, Durban, South Africa
Nathan Kibwami, Department of Construction Economics and Management, School of the Built Environment, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda
Sibusiso Moyo, Research, Innovation and Engagement, Durban University of Technology, Durban, South Africa

Abstract

Concerns have been raised in Africa to address women’s construction health and safety needs adequately. These concerns include less participation of women in the sector, low income and less benefits being given to women, lack of adequate protective construction clothing suited for women, unfavourable employment conditions for women, and lack of construction site security and other facilities for women. This research article provides an overview of the suggested solutions to address the concerns raised. In addition, practical interventions being implemented by the Durban University of Technology and Makerere University research collaboration project team to address women’s needs in construction health and safety through women empowerment and involvement in construction research, education and practice in Africa are outlined. The main approaches applied in this research study are as follows: use of relevant publications on women’s construction health and safety needs in Africa and analysis of data obtained from reliable construction professional bodies in South Africa and Uganda to demonstrate gender imbalances.

Contribution: The main contribution of this study was to emphasise the significance of including and involving women in construction research, education and practice as a major solution to address women’s health and safety needs in Africa in the future as women are in a much better position to understand their own needs than men.


Keywords

women’s health and safety; construction research and education; construction practice; construction industry; Africa

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