Original Research

Inter-religious dialogue in schools: A pedagogical and civic unavoidability

A. Abdool, J. L. van der Walt, C. Wolhuter
HTS Teologiese Studies / Theological Studies | Vol 63, No 2 | a211 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/hts.v63i2.211 | © 2007 A. Abdool, J. L. van der Walt, C. Wolhuter | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 05 May 2007 | Published: 06 May 2007

About the author(s)

A. Abdool, North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, South Africa
J. L. van der Walt, North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, South Africa
C. Wolhuter, North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, South Africa

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Abstract

Social and civic conflict inspired by the fundamental convictions of different religious groups seems to be rife all over the world, also in schools. One way of addressing this problem is to promote inter-religious dialogue. To establish the viability of this solution, the authors take several steps. They analyze the phenomenon “religion” and discover that it is constituted of several layers or levels that have to be accounted for in the proposed inter-religious dialogue in schools. After discussing the term “dialogue” they consider several approaches to religious diversity or plurality to find a suitable basis for the proposed inter-religious dialogue in schools. Based on these analyses, the authors argue that schools (teacher-educators and learners) should be allowed to engage in inter-religious dialogue as part of their pedagogical and civic duty. This will ensure a better understanding of others and their religions, also at the deepest spiritual level. Such comprehension can contribute to the more peaceful co-existence of people in religiously pluralist societies.

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Crossref Citations

1. The Representation of Religion in Religion Education: Notes from the South African Periphery
Abdulkader Tayob
Education Sciences  vol: 8  issue: 3  first page: 146  year: 2018  
doi: 10.3390/educsci8030146