Original Research - Special Collection: P.M. Venter Dedication

Die mooi drome van burgerlike teologie verander toe in kerklike nagmerries

G. M.J. (Gafie) van Wyk
HTS Teologiese Studies / Theological Studies | Vol 68, No 1 | a1338 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/hts.v68i1.1338 | © 2012 G. M.J. (Gafie) van Wyk | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 25 September 2012 | Published: 23 November 2012


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Abstract

The sweet dreams of civil theology then became ecclesiastical nightmares. With the 69th General Assembly of 2010 the Netherdutch Reformed Church reached a fork in the road. The Church is still hesitating, unsure which road it should take at the fork. But she can not hesitate much longer. History will not wait infinitely for those who find it difficult to make choices on political and ecclesiastical matters. This article reflects on the recent history of the Church that brought her to this fork in the road, the different choices that are on the table for the Church at this stage and how she will shape her own future by the choices she will have to make in the near future. Rather than presenting a systematic argument on the matter at hand, the article reflects from different perspectives on the problems the Church is facing. Politics, ecclesiastical renewal, the role of tradition and heritage in ecclesiastic reflection, Church unity and the role of confessions of faith as a binding factor in the ecclesiastical community are used as points of reference to reflect on the current crisis in the Church. Church leaders are called upon to break with a tradition of civil obedience serving the interests of the politicians in power. The Church should rather bravely fulfil her calling to practise prophetic criticism in society so that she can help to promote justice for all in the most efficient way possible.

Keywords

Church; politics; renewal; heritage; tradition; unity; confession; truth

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